I am a Social Justice Witch who goes by xe and xir pronouns, a technopagan devoted to Hermes and Hestia, and a fat black dfab femme. I am everything Tea Partiers fear, and one day, I will be president of the United States. Look forward to my reign of terror.

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This is a multi-fandom blog that ain't got time for racism, sexism, ableism or shaming people for their body, religion, who they have sex with, or how much they have sex, and if you think reverse racism, heterophobia, allyphobia, or MRAs are things I should care about, you want to fuck RIGHT the hell off, because you have stumbled upon the WRONG blog, friend.

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Feel free to chat me up on the reblog, send me some asks, or ask me to tag anything problematic for you. I don't bite. Much.

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I have recently fallen into hard times, and I can't figure out how to add a Paypal button, so if you want to send me some money and help me out, my Paypal email address is PFGurl4Life2005@yahoo.com

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RP

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AO3

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Fatshion

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My Commentary

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My Fanfiction Tag

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Avatar by this lovely human bean!

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image

egberts:

CHRISTMAS EVE IS TOMORROW

sherlock-mania:

remember-pants-terezi:

heyxkids:

YOU CANT CHANGE THE VOLUME OF THE VOICE IN YOUR HEAD

FUCKING TRY I DARE YOU

ITS IMPOSSIBLE AND ITS REALLY FUCKING WITH MY MIND SOMEONE HUG ME

I CAN MAKE IT SCREAM WITHOUT GETTING LOUDER

H E L P

Holy shit whispering is the same volume as shouting as loud as I can

cosplayingwhileblack:

Character: Yoko Littner
Series: Gurren Lagann
Cosplayer: www.facebook.com/domigrowls
Photographer: www.facebook.com/EuphoriaCosplayStudios
SUBMISSION

cosplayingwhileblack:

Character: Yoko Littner

Series: Gurren Lagann

Cosplayer: www.facebook.com/domigrowls

Photographer: www.facebook.com/EuphoriaCosplayStudios

SUBMISSION

dendropsyche:

thenimbus:

bonbonbunny:

'What kind of overalls does Mario wear?'

image

Yep, I laughed out loud

I love the “oh no” like he fucking knows he’s going to hear a shitty ass joke

(Source: youtube.com)

bronzebasilisk:

darkheartsclub:

chronicpnin:

what do men want? it’s sausage. so much sausage. tons of sausage. They want their chapped. Burly lips wrapped around a length of greasy sausage as it runs over their tongues, probes, and then gently slides down the back of their throats

IS MANCAVE INUENDO BECAUSE IF ITS WASN’T IT IS NOW

AWW YEAH WANNA JAM THAT FAT BRAT IN MY MAAN CAAAAVE

bronzebasilisk:

darkheartsclub:

chronicpnin:

what do men want? it’s sausage. so much sausage. tons of sausage. They want their chapped. Burly lips wrapped around a length of greasy sausage as it runs over their tongues, probes, and then gently slides down the back of their throats

IS MANCAVE INUENDO BECAUSE IF ITS WASN’T IT IS NOW

AWW YEAH WANNA JAM THAT FAT BRAT IN MY MAAN CAAAAVE

decolonizingminds:

laliberty:

Marijuana stops child’s severe seizures

THis is why the drug war blows. This is amazing

(Source: laliberty)

(Source: sad-plath)

combeferrie:

i hope you wake up on christmas morning happy and i hope you are warm and i hope you had good dreams. i hope you get nice gifts and i hope you have hot chocolate. i hope snowflakes stick to your eyelashes and i hope you make the most beautiful snow angel. i hope that even though i will not be curled up with you on christmas morning that you are comfy and cozy and i hope you have a wonderful christmas

(Source: emmfairy)

Life becomes easier when you learn to accept an apology you never got.

—Robert Brault (via payning)

(Source: creatingaquietmind)

Originally published on Blackademic and cross-posted here with their permission.

Although I am not new to masculinity, I am new to being a black man.

I am new to the experience of male privilege and its consequence of authority, as well as the disprivilege of race that marks my black male body as innately suspect.

It is the delicate balance between power and criminal that has allowed me to see the machinations of misogyny in an entirely different light.

Whereas black cisgender men have generally approached feminist discourse through the academic texts and writings of black women, for me, it is my lived experience as a black female that has shaped the ways in which I embrace and practice black feminism.

Prior to physical transition, I wasn’t naïve to the ways in which certain forms of black masculinity contribute to the oppression of women.

I grew up in a family of single black women who loved – really loved – black men, even though it was their husbands, boyfriends, and sometimes brothers who were the perpetrators of emotional and physical abuse.

I watched my mother, my beautiful mother, struggle with the demons of mental illness and drug use.

Her sickness, it seemed, gave the men in the neighborhood free range to take advantage of her financially and sexually. Though I’ve never met him to form an opinion, my aunt still declares it was my absent father who literally drove my mother to madness.

I was witness to the sadness my grandmother felt as all three of her sons followed in their father’s alcoholic footsteps.

She still smiled through all of the pain, but I saw the sadness when my uncle, her child, routinely threatened her in the same ways as did the abusive husband she left years before.

I learned to resent black men.

As I grew and my body changed, so did my interactions with males that I encountered.

I suffered the threat of sexual violence as my female body consistently invited unsolicited advances from (black) men despite my masculine presentation.

I became more aware of the ads, music, and propaganda that told me that I was ugly, unattractive, and good enough only as a sexual object for black men.

Even though intro courses to race and women’s studies in college began to offer me the critical tools to somewhat reject these images, I still felt shame as it was impossible to escape the reality that sexist images of black women suffocated me.

When I began to date women, I repeatedly encountered the aggressive homophobe who thought their magical black dicks could turn me “straight.”

In some instances, I would rebuff their advances with jokes though I was well aware of the possibility of danger in doing so.

I learned to fear black men.

Although my relationship with black men and masculinity was fraught, I still desired to be one; I knew that gender transition would be a necessary part of my life’s journey.

For some transmen, their female past conjures up memories of pain and humiliation, and rightfully so. These feelings are not absent from my journey, but I’ve come to embrace my past as a beneficial asset to my practice of a progressive black masculinity.

Primarily, I am very careful with my interactions with women in order to not be perceived as a physical threat.

I am always thoughtful of my newfound “bulk” due to hormones and the ways in which my masculine body moves and occupies space.

While walking on the streets, I maintain my distance from women. I avoid eye contact unless we are engaging in mutual conversation and even then, I do not stare.

The memory of harassment as a woman doesn’t allow me to.

In professional situations, I am always aware of my male privilege.

I do not hog the intellectual space, and I make it a point to deeply value the input of my female collaborators.

My goal is not to be the dominant voice of reason, but to attempt to exist as an equal colleague.

Furthermore, in my work, I find it very important to centralize the experiences of women to supplement the work that they are doing for themselves.

Although I identify as a heterosexual male, in my relationship with my partner, I strive to avoid replicating the harmful gendered dynamics that are traditionally associated with heterosexuality.

I make it a point to share my feelings and evaluate my shortcomings.

I am not perfect and sometimes I slip, but the emphasis I’ve placed on expressing my feelings has provided a deviation from conventional notions of black masculinity.

This gesture does not negate my manhood; rather, it permits me to love and perform gender in a much healthier way.

Additionally, I do not use my manhood as an excuse to cheat, to view my partner as another sexual conquest, or to marginalize her feelings.

In my brief experience of living as a black male, I’ve learned that it is difficult to challenge misogyny in male dominated spaces.

I have found myself in a number of uncomfortable situations with men who openly insult and humiliate women, and I feel silenced.

Not because of the fear of being outed as trans, but I fear being perceived as a failed version of black masculinity – a fear that I believe imprisons all black men– adding to the reproduction of a violent patriarchal society.

I am not a perfect man.

I am not immune to the assumptions that are expected of me, and sometimes, I act them out.

However, my transition journey has allowed me to begin the process of forgiving my absent father, my alcoholic uncle, and the cat-calling homophobe on the corner.

Because black feminism allows me to love myself, I have learned to love black men.

Want to discuss this further? Login to our online forum and start a post! If you’re not already registered as a forum user, please register first here.

Dr. Ziegler is an Oakland based award winning artist, writer, public speaker and the first person to hold the Ph.D of African American Studies from Northwestern University.

(Source: fuckyeahlgbtqblackpeople)

Shots fired

(Source: fujikomine)

goldenheartedrose:

emeraldincandescent:

madesomecocoa-gotengaged:

emeraldincandescent:

You know what I would like to see? A portrayal of an autistic person as religious. Maybe even has their religion as their special interest, so they can name all the saints or have memorized the Quran or something. Basically, why are all the cishet white boy TV autistics cishet white boy atheist autistics? 

I think it’s because of the insistence that these cishet white boy autistics have to be ~logical.~ that’s why they’re always good at math or science, never reading or writing or art. because the allistic people writing them can’t wrap their heads around the fact that autism isn’t monolithic, or that intelligent people can have religion without sacrificing their intelligence.

Yeah, that last question was mostly rhetorical. But you raise very good points.

This I find really interesting, because one of the first blogs I ever had featured anywhere where I talked about autism was on TheCaffeinatedAutistic where I talked about what it was like to grow up autistic in a church environment. And it was featured on ThAutcast, and that was amazing, but soooooo many of the comments were all “I thought that autistic people CAN’T believe in anything”? And that pissed me off so much, because it basically invalidated my entire belief system and made me question my diagnosis and siiiiiiiigh.

But yes, I would love to see an autistic character portrayed as religious.

medievalpoc:

Thomas Rowlandson
Christmas Gambols
England (1804)
Hand-coloured etching
Print with Watercolor on Paper, 27.7 x 23.7 cm.
Royal Collection Trust, UK.

A hand-coloured print of a drunken party taking place in a kitchen where four couples of domestic servants frolic with each other. In the centre of the print, a footman holds up a maid to kiss her underneath a bunch of mistletoe hanging from the ceiling. Another couple lie on the floor kissing in front of the hearth. A punch bowl and glasses are in the right of the foreground.
Inscribed in the plate: Pubd Nov 30 1804 by T Rowlandson N 1 James Street Adelphi / Rowlandson 1804

[x]
Merry Christmas!

medievalpoc:

Thomas Rowlandson

Christmas Gambols

England (1804)

Hand-coloured etching

Print with Watercolor on Paper, 27.7 x 23.7 cm.

Royal Collection Trust, UK.

A hand-coloured print of a drunken party taking place in a kitchen where four couples of domestic servants frolic with each other. In the centre of the print, a footman holds up a maid to kiss her underneath a bunch of mistletoe hanging from the ceiling. Another couple lie on the floor kissing in front of the hearth. A punch bowl and glasses are in the right of the foreground.

Inscribed in the plate: Pubd Nov 30 1804 by T Rowlandson N 1 James Street Adelphi / Rowlandson 1804

[x]

Merry Christmas!

lightspeedsound:

curvellas:

theuppitynegras:

jesuswithalacefront:

brood-mother:

slunchy:

magicnein:

let’s stop making jokes about girls and start making jokes about white boys

here i’ll start

*white boy voice* chill out man it was just a joke

[walks into class 10 minutes late with a can of Monster] sorry I’m late I got frontpage on Reddit

[wipes cheeto dust off onto cargo shorts] so if you support gender equality does that mean it’s ok to hit women now?

[arrives in the winter with shorts and flip-flops] reverse racism is just as bad as being in the KKK

[pauses Macklemore song] why aren’t there scholarships for white men

[adjusts fedora, pausing my little pony episode] women use sex against men because it’s the only asset they have

[mangling of asian language] whatever dude it’s not racist if I don’t mean to be racist 

In 2002, having spent more than three years in one residence for the first time in my life, I got called for jury duty. I show up on time, ready to serve. When we get to the voir dire, the lawyer says to me, “I see you’re an astrophysicist. What’s that?” I answer, “Astrophysics is the laws of physics, applied to the universe—the Big Bang, black holes, that sort of thing.” Then he asks, “What do you teach at Princeton?” and I say, “I teach a class on the evaluation of evidence and the relative unreliability of eyewitness testimony.” Five minutes later, I’m on the street.

A few years later, jury duty again. The judge states that the defendant is charged with possession of 1,700 milligrams of cocaine. It was found on his body, he was arrested, and he is now on trial. This time, after the Q&A is over, the judge asks us whether there are any questions we’d like to ask the court, and I say, “Yes, Your Honor. Why did you say he was in possession of 1,700 milligrams of cocaine? That equals 1.7 grams. The ‘thousand’ cancels with the ‘milli-’ and you get 1.7 grams, which is less than the weight of a dime.” Again I’m out on the street.

Neil deGrasse Tyson (via sarasleepygirl)

They don’t want smart people on the jury.

They want people they can dupe into a guilty verdict, especially for poc

(via sourcedumal)